What is an Emulsion in Skin Care?

What Is An Emulsion?

Lotions, liniments, massage oils, creams and compresses are all external preparations such as moisturisers but are also used to treat conditions such as skin problems and rashes, to relieve bruising, aches and pains.

But what is an emulsion and what does it actually mean.

All of these products tend to be water and oil preparations and as a result of the oil content will absorb into the skin.

Making a lotion, cream liniment etc is based on blending the oil and water in the right proportions to make an emulsion. Leave it long enough and it will eventually separate. By adding an emulsifier, this becomes a stable product and will remain bound. The emulsifiers you then select are dependent on which type of emulsion it is.

So What Is The Difference?

An emulsion can be made in two ways: either as a oil in water emulsion or a water in oil. Sound the same don’t they and they do create a similar result.

Explanation

If it is a oil in water emulsion, then the oil is the disperse phase and the water is the continuous phase.

If it is a water in oil emulsion, then the water is the disperse phase and the oil is the continuous phase.

Either type of cream/lotion can separate into it’s components over time even with the emulsifier present and can sometimes be caused by extreme temperatures, the wrong proportion of the disperse component and the addition of other components such as alcohol.

Most people these days are selective of what they put on their skin, so be aware of what type of emulsion it is. Try to find a product that has natural emulsifiers in it and uses natural oils are the base. Your skin will thank you for it.

History of Skincare Part 5: Imperial China: From the Tang Dynasty to the Ming Dynasty, 618-1644

Desiring the Pale

By the time the Tang dynasty rolled around, the women of the Imperial Court had turned skin care and cosmetic application into a fine art form. Borrowing artistic techniques from the Buddhism that had spread throughout the country, women turned themselves into gilded statues, complete with smooth, porcelain skin and facial appliques. Having a pale complexion continued to rise in importance as court women went to new and greater heights to whiten their skin, both temporarily and permanently.

From Pre-Imperial times, Chinese women had desired pale skin. As agriculture became increasingly important to the culture and the economy, tanned skin grew to be associated with a working class made up of farmers and fishermen. While noble women at first desired a whiter complexion to show that they did not have to work, however, a powdered face and smooth skin soon became a fashion statement. During the Tang dynasty, courtesans began taking more extreme measures to lighten the skin on their faces. While they continued to press on white powders made from lead, they also used special gels and lotions derived from natural ingredients to remove pigment and permanently bleach their skin. One of the most popular gels was made from songyi mushrooms, an ingredient that is still used in many skin lighteners today.

The Seven Steps to Beauty

Even in this time of lead powders and pigment-altering creams, the Chinese approach to skin care was still a holistic one. Nutrition, health and circulation were still considered to be necessary to maintaining a beautiful complexion and many lotions were developed using medicinal herbs popular in traditional medicine. In fact, while skin care had been previously confined to the bed chamber, many Tang dynasty women carried small containers of lotions and other cosmetics so that they could touch up their faces at will.

This is not to say, however, that Tang dynasty courtesans applied their make up in public. Their make up was, in fact, applied in seven separate steps each morning. The first step was to powder the face with a thick white foundation. The second step was the apply rouge to the cheeks. The third step was to gild the forehead with golden ocher. The ocher was painted on in complex patterns based on the gold gilding of Buddhist statues. The fourth step was to trace the eyebrows. The fifth step was to paint the lips a brilliant red. The sixth step was to dot the cheeks. The seventh and final step was to paste a floral applique between the eyes. (You can read more about the seven steps to beauty here: http://www.chinatoday.com.cn/English/e2004/e200411/p60.htm )

The Art of Applique

Although facial appliques first gained major popularity during the Tang dynasty, they remained popular throughout the many centuries of Imperial China. As outlined by the seven steps of cosmetic application, there were actually several different types of appliques. While the dotted cheek had been around since the early days of the Imperial Court, it had, by this time, lost any remnants of a practical use and was used strictly for fashion. In fact, it was very rare for the dots to even be round anymore. While one of the most popular designs was a crescent moon across the cheek, these so-called dots could take the form of any number of shapes from flowers to insects. The floral applique placed between the eyes had a similar number of variations. It could be made from paper, gold foil or shell and the patterns ranged from flowers to fans, from dragon flies to oxhorns.

While not precisely an applique, traced eyebrows continued to be an important part of facial adornment. By this time, designs had become far more elaborate than they had been during the Qin or Han dynasties. While the different shapes were generally patterned after objects found in nature, the shapes themselves were a far cry from the natural shape of an eyebrow. Willow leaf eyebrows were one of the most popular designs, with round, olive-shaped eyebrows not far behind. The Emperor Xuanzong even commissioned a book called Shi Mei Tu, which outlined ten different eyebrow patterns. (You can read more about facial appliques and eyebrow patterns here: http://www.chinatoday.com.cn/English/e2004/e200411/p60.htm )

From lead powders to skin bleaches to eyebrows shaped like olives, many of the skin care techniques and cosmetic approaches of Imperial China seem foreign in today’s world. Their holistic approach to skin care, however, and their whimsical make up show that Imperial China still has a lot to offer the modern world.

Golden Tips on Skin Care for 50+ Women

“This is the decade of collagen loss and saggy skin,” says Jessica Wu, a famous dermatologist. In your 50’s your beauty can be everlasting-” a skin of beauty is a joy forever” as John Keats would have said it. Just follow this fantastic skin-care strategy. Just Look Young Forever!

Skin-Care Strategy for 50+ Women round the clock.

A.M.

Antioxidant Serum or Cream

Inflammation may affect your skin and triggers aging. Try using any good antioxidant (it reduces inflammation) first thing in the morning.

Hydrating Sunscreen or Moisturizer with SPF

Pick some rich base sunscreen to minimize years-old damage to the surface on your skin. In case of dry skin, apply to your skin a healing ointment (Aquaphor) by mixing it with any non-creamy formula. Lancome Bienfait Multi-Vital SPF 30 Cream is quite helpful.

Eye Cream

Make it a part of your daily morning routine. Try Glow by Dr. Brandt Revitalizing Retinol Eye Cream.

P.M.

Gentle Cleanser

It is a reliable anti-aging treatment and works your skin smoothly. Try Garnier Clean & Nourishing Cleansing Oil.

Antioxidant Serum or Cream

Repetition time is not an evil ploy as you can use the same Antioxidant of the morning.

Exfoliating Treatment

Some prescription creams like Renova or Retin-A work wonders to slough skin, boosting cell turnover and triggering sloughing skin, encouraging cell turnover, and carrying on collagen production. As an alternation choice, you can take glycolic acid or peptides prove useful as well.

Estrogen an excellent solution for 50+ anti-aging skin care

Estrogen is magic for anti-aging skin care. A charm which is available in everyday life with easier access. This superb hormone stirs healthy skin cell functioning-and can even help slow skin aging. So when estrogen levels plunge amid menopause, “the skin cannot secure itself, look after hydration, or create solid collagen the way it once could,” clarifies Joshua Zeichner, a dermatologist in New York City. What’s more, he includes the old skin experiences lost natural lipids, like ceramides, unsaturated fats, and cholesterol, which adds to irritation, lack of hydration, and an entirely traded off dampness obstruction.

If you want a healthy and natural skin, you have to take care of it and do some precautionary steps and apply tricks as mentioned above. Nothing in this world is free, so in order to remain fit and look healthier and prettier, you should remain alert regarding your skin and beauty even in your 50’s.

Effective Skin Care Habits

The largest organ in the body are not your intestines, it’s your skin! The skin faces so much every day that it deserves more than just normal skin care. What it need are effective skin care habits.

For regular people, skin care is similar to taking a bath every day or washing the face before sleep. But there is so much more than just washing. Skin care can start from the little habits we have to the little details of the food we eat.

Right Way of Washing

The first effective skin care habit that we all know is washing. There’s a reason why that is the most common answer when asked about skin care. There’s a right way to washing the face and the body.

Washing takes place twice a day, not just before sleep. This includes using a facial cleanser to scoop out the dirt in your pores. Make-up remover is recommended for those who wear makeup. If you are in a skin whitening regimen, follow this up with toner and moisturizer. The neck is often overlooked when washing the face. Don’t forget it next time.

Washing the face is different with the body. Using lukewarm water is better and relaxing than hot water. The natural skin moisture and oils are washed off with hot water. People with dry skin will have worse conditions with it.

Post-washing Habits

Some people are in a rush when it comes to drying themselves off after washing. They tend to scrub the towels onto their face and body. The right way to dry the skin is by gentle pats. Drying all the water completely will prevent the skin to absorb excess moisture. Leaving the skin with a little moisture let it rehydrate after a lukewarm bath.

Facial cream, moisturizer, and lotions are applied after drying. This will make the absorption of the ingredients better and make the product more effective.

For products that are used for daytime, choose the ones with SPF. The skin benefits from sun protection all the year round. The sun is getting harsher every season. Packing up with SPF is a good preventive measure.

Every once a while, do some exfoliation. Remove the dead skin cells that settle on top of the skin. This will make way for the new skin cells to come out. Exfoliating can come in the form of creams, scrubs, or loofah.

The face can be exfoliated as well but in a gentler manner. Exfoliating can scrape off oils and moisture so keep a moisturizer to use after.

Right Eating and Drinking Habits

Eating and drinking is a vital part of our lives. Without care on what we eat, we only let toxins and harmful ingredients enter our body. These come out in our skin, one way or another.

When the body lacks the right amount of water intake, the skin will dry up. It will also become more dull and lifeless. The water does more than just cleansing the body from the inside.

Not all delicious foods are healthy. Depending on your skin needs, you may need to take more of certain fruits and vegetables.

If you face stress, dirt, or pollution on a regular basis, pack up with foods that are high in antioxidants. This includes apricots, blueberries and its sister berries, oranges, kale, spinach and more. Avocados grow in select seasons so get some to help in hydrating the skin. Tomatoes, pumpkin, and carrots are also great for the skin.

Fats always sound bad for some reasons. But some of them are actually good for the body. There are good kinds that make the skin look more youthful. Olive oil is one good example that is also versatile in the kitchen. There are also healthy fats found in nuts, fatty fish, and eggs.

These skin care habits are easy to adapt to our daily lifestyle. Follow these steps to take much better care of your body.